Strategic & Capital Planning Seminars

10:30 am - 11:00 am

Break & Exhibition Visit

11:00 am - 11:20 am

Cheshire and Merseyside Health Care Partnership Sustainability and Innovation Project

The HCPs approach to sustainability, is a collaborative approach to ensure the principles of sustainability and social value are embedded across the Partnership.
• As a social value accelerator site, C&M are keen to harness the positives that came as a result of COVID and build back better, reducing reliance on the healthcare, and wider public services, by putting sustainability principles at the heart of all decision-making processes.
• The aim is to deliver an ethical framework of behaviours, resulting in long term behavioural changes as to how people use and view the NHS, and wider public sector Through working with colleagues across the Partnership we are aiming to ensure behavioural change can occur and people can change the way they currently access NHS (and wider) services and see an increase in community resilience.
• Our Social Value Charter launched in 2019, since then 35 organisations across Cheshire and Merseyside have signed up to the Charter. The Charter describes our local vision and principles for maximising the potential of social value locally, our principles include building on the strengths of people and our communities, enabling people to live a 'valued and dignified life'.
• Working together across sectors to achieve social value outcomes, foster innovation and reduce avoidable inequalities linked to the Marmot Principles: Protecting health and social care services for future generations; Giving a voice to local communities; Social Value will be embedded as core practice, behaviours and the way that we operate.
• The ICS is working with partners and the public to establish an Anchor Institute Charter with an agreed set of principles, anchored in local communities, for organisations across the region to adopt. The charter will be reflective of local needs and determine the organisational behaviour required to deliver them.e in Merseyside.

SPEAKER

  • Dave Sweeney Executive Director - Cheshire and Merseyside Health Care Partnership
11:20 am - 11:40 am

A New Wave of Community Hospitals

Gloucestershire Health and Care NHS Foundation Trust's new community hospital will efficiently alleviate pressure on acute hospitals and provide integrated care systems that will transform local health provision.

The new hospital in the Forest of Dean will replace two older buildings (Dilke Memorial Hospital and Lydney Community Hospital) and will modernise the infrastructure to allow the NHS to provide sustainable high-quality in-patient and outpatient services for many years to come.

The design brings together a range of services: local urgent care/minor injury units and out of hours service, x-ray, radiology and ultrasound services, consulting and treatment rooms for outpatient clinics, a children's clinic area, endoscopy suite, clinic space for dentistry and/or podiatry and a purpose-built therapy gym for rehabilitation. As well as community areas within the hospital e.g. a group room and shop, the skate park (currently on the land) is being relocated nearby with other local improvements making the new hospital a central focus within the community.

Kevin Adams from Gloucestershire Health and Care NHS Foundation Trust will outline the extensive consultation and business case for replacing the two outdated hospitals with one new build using innovative features for the best possible sustainable local care, efficiency and cost control.

Abz Randera, Architect from ONE Creative environments (ONE) that received Architectural Practice of the Year at last year's Healthcare Estates awards, will share details of the design which creatively overcomes site challenges and includes a range of measures following the Pandemic to maintain infection control standards. Abz will also outline how sustainability is central to the design supporting the NHS' ambition of net zero carbon emissions with the design aiming for an Excellent BREEAM rating to help reduce energy consumption, carbon and ongoing costs.

SPEAKERS

  • Abz Randera Architect - ONE Creative environments (ONE)
  • Kevin Adams Associate Director of Estates, Facilities & Medical Equipment - Gloucestershire Health & Care NHS Foundation Trust
11:40 am - 12:00 pm

Modern Methods of Construction: Looking Back to See Ahead

The Government has repeatedly stated its commitment to Modern Methods of Construction (MMC), and more specifically a platform-based approach.

Both the Department and the New Hospital's Programme (NHP) have echoed this philosophy, the latter expressing a commitment to "embrace a holistic approach to MMC" and "drive a platform-led kit of parts approach to achieve a step-change in productivity, cost-effectiveness, timeliness of delivery and carbon efficiencies "

Whilst this trajectory has been clearly cast in policy, the implications and practicalities at an organizational and project level are somewhat less clear.

This presentation therefore demystifies the subject of MMC, outlining what a platform-based approach is and its potential compatibility with the healthcare sector.

We review the profile of both the historical pipeline (commissioned by NHS Trusts) and the supply market over the past decade, to provide insight regarding the scale of adaptation required.
Informed by data analysis of over 1800 projects (equating to £20bn investment), we look backwards to see ahead the potential opportunities and challenges presented by this new way of working.

 

SPEAKER

10:30 am - 11:00 am

Coffee & Exhibition Visit

11:00 am - 11:20 am

Equipment Planning and Digital Transformation for the NHS and NHP Schemes

In January 2020 the UK Government gave the green light to 40 digitally advanced hospital projects. Since then, a number of Trust's have been preparing their Outline Business Cases to support these redevelopments. This long-term, strategic investment in the future of the NHS to ensure world-class healthcare staff have world-class facilities to deliver cutting-edge care, requires investment in the right buildings and facilities where staff and patients can utilise technology and data to deliver better, integrated care and empower people to manage their own health.
The NHSx and ATOS document sets out a Blueprint for Digital Innovation giving guidance to National Hospital Programme Scheme Directors together with detailed design principles. This is based on international and industry expertise, global digital exemplars and best practice, provides a structured approach to help guide local discussions for the adoption of technology in the new hospitals through a set of design principles.
There are two key documents that NHSX have issued: The Health Infrastructure Plan - Blueprint for Digitally enhanced hospitals: This blueprint recommends type of technologies and potential technologies for consideration - the content within a digital hospital and the design principles behind them and secondly Intelligent Hospitals - Delivering Digital Standardisation, giving guidance on how to deliver a digital hospital. With some OBC Equipment budgets running north of £35m, the interface with the digital technologies is now imperative.

The Hillingdon Hospitals working with MTS Ltd have interpreted this into a working document of assumptions and costs to support the OBC having looked at where the responsibilities might lie for the specification, procurement, installation and commissioning of all these technologies. The National Hospital Programme schemes which include advice on "Delivering Digital Standardisation" has an 89 point checklist which have been addressed and the implication to both cultural readiness; the cost of these technologies; and the responsibility have been addressed.

SPEAKERS

  • John Reeve Digital Redevelopment Programme Lead - The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Ruth Strickland Chief Operating Officer - MTS Health Ltd
11:20 am - 11:40 am

Asset Management and BIM – A Mutual Dependency

The interface between AM and BIM is in information management. AM requires structured information; BIM can provide it.
Working together to understand and use the information management standards (ISO 19650 et al) allows information silos to be opened up, processes to be integrated and the provision and use of digital information to be aligned with AM priorities to address specific purposes.
It is difficult to overstate the fundamental degree to which AM activity relies on information - complete, accurate, clear information about the buildings, facilities, infrastructure and equipment that make up the assets being managed.
It is difficult to overstate the importance of strategic asset management in enabling effective healthcare estates planning, facilitating the involvement of digital tools and techniques, and providing the basis for reaching net zero targets and improving infrastructure resilience.

Mutual interests and support
BIM can help AM in many ways. By working together at the Information Management (IM) interface, BIM can provide sharable, structured data with visual tools to enhance understanding and communication. This can work in a continuous loop with both strategic information forming a reliable foundation and dynamic data adding real-time enhancements.

Firstly, BIM can provide accurate information to help build a better understanding of the asset base, compile asset registers, assess and record condition, meet statutory requirements and improve system functionality. Secondly, and perhaps less well appreciated, BIM can also provide valuable means to affect asset management outcomes, with better-informed decisions, improved suitability for purpose, increased energy efficiency, reduced unit cost, and better asset performance.

Asset Management and BIM - A Mutual Dependency.

SPEAKERS

11:40 am - 12:00 pm

Best Value Procurement when Delivering Healthcare Projects

The C&M Sustainability Board was developed to create a forum for ICS, Health, Social Care and Voluntary Sectors to collectively develop a partnership approach to sustainability and innovation. The Board has around 100 members and provides opportunities to share good practice and encourage collaboration between organisations, so that we can improve as a system and ensure accountability and that the principles are being embedded across the Partnership.
• The sub-groups for the Board provide a platform to share examples of work taking place across the Partnership - and wider- to share learning so that we can capture best practice examples and set realistic priorities based on the existing work processes taking place.
• We pride ourselves on developing and maintaining a partnership approach with our local authority and voluntary sector colleagues, involving them with an aim to create and develop sustainable good practice across sectors. Through this approach, we collaboratively developed the Social Value Award. The award aims to help organisations to achieve their staff and volunteer recruitment and retention strategy, deliver Corporate Social Responsibility, Social Value and recognises organisations as an 'Anchor Institution'.
• In line with the Greener NHS Programme and three-year strategy to net-zero, the Partnership and Trusts have been developing individual Green Plans which will feed into the overarching ICS Green Plan.
• This work has led the Partnership's approach to ensuring sustainability is a part of all that we do, setting an expectation that sustainability and social value principles must be demonstrated across all Programmes, within all Places. We have established ambitions and priorities within our ICS Green Plan, which was developed collaboratively, including the ambition for all NHS trusts and the ICS to gain the Navajo Charter Mark - a signifier of good practice, commitment and knowledge of the specific needs, issues and barriers facing LGBTQIA+ people in Merseyside.

SPEAKER

2:30 pm - 2:50 pm

. Cheshire and Mersyside Health Care Partnership Social Value Charter and Anchor journey

The HCPs approach to sustainability, is a collaborative approach to ensure the principles of sustainability and social value are embedded across the Partnership.
• As a social value accelerator site, C&M are keen to harness the positives that came as a result of COVID and build back better, reducing reliance on the healthcare, and wider public services, by putting sustainability principles at the heart of all decision-making processes.
• The aim is to deliver an ethical framework of behaviours, resulting in long term behavioural changes as to how people use and view the NHS, and wider public sector Through working with colleagues across the Partnership we are aiming to ensure behavioural change can occur and people can change the way they currently access NHS (and wider) services and see an increase in community resilience.
• Our Social Value Charter launched in 2019, since then 35 organisations across Cheshire and Merseyside have signed up to the Charter. The Charter describes our local vision and principles for maximising the potential of social value locally, our principles include building on the strengths of people and our communities, enabling people to live a 'valued and dignified life'.
• Working together across sectors to achieve social value outcomes, foster innovation and reduce avoidable inequalities linked to the Marmot Principles: Protecting health and social care services for future generations; Giving a voice to local communities; Social Value will be embedded as core practice, behaviours and the way that we operate.
• The ICS is working with partners and the public to establish an Anchor Institute Charter with an agreed set of principles, anchored in local communities, for organisations across the region to adopt. The charter will be reflective of local needs and determine the organisational behaviour required to deliver them.

SPEAKER

  • Becky Jones Head of Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability - Cheshire and Merseyside Health Care Partnership
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm

Designing for the Health of Coastal Communities

According to 2017 data, there were approximately 11.8 million people aged 65 and over in the UK, and by 2050 that number could reach 19 million. Hospital admissions are also steadily increasing year-on-year, a good proportion of these represented by elderly people who rely on continuing care.

In parallel to this trend, England's Chief Medical Officer has signalled that the country needs a national strategy to tackle health inequalities for seaside towns. Coastal towns often have older populations with more complex health needs, but historical planning has often underprovided for these areas.

This presentation will explore the changes that can be made to the way that health is managed and delivered to enable health and social care to operate together to support wellbeing, rather than responding to accident and illness. This integrated care model has a strong focus on patient wellness, with less-institutional community spaces and therapeutic environments that provide excellent daylighting, ventilation, views, comfortable acoustics, and access to outside space.

The presentations will explore forward-thinking projects where an integrated model of care has been used to address the complex health needs of coastal towns and discuss the design factors that are critical to their success.

One such project is the redevelopment of Whitby Hospital, which sees the adaptation of an outdated and under-utilised facility to create a health and social care hub, which supports the integrated delivery of primary care, secondary care, and community services.

Another is the pioneering Jean Bishop Integrated Care Centre in Hull, which is the first of a new class of NHS facilities to cater for the needs of an increasingly elderly population without the recourse to hospital admission.

The presentation concludes by looking at the lessons that can be learnt from these examples and how the fundamental principles can be applied across the country.

SPEAKERS

  • Sonia Rafferty Service Manager  – Whitby Hospital & Community Services - Humber Teaching NHS Foundation Trust
  • Lianne Knotts Director - Medical Architecture
3:10 pm - 3:30 pm

Realising the Benefits of MMC in Healthcare

Curtins are proud to have over 30 years' experience in the successful delivery of projects with innovative offsite manufactured structural solutions which are now often referred to as Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) for both Public and Private Sector clients and Manufacturers from early feasibility appraisals through to construction detailing in accordance with Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA) workflows.

We have experience of working on major government pathfinder projects and programmes within healthcare (including New Hospitals Programme and other funding streams), Schools (including the Department for Education Schools MMC Framework), and MOJ (including the current Alliance for Prisons Programme.)

We have worked on numerous award winning MMC projects, including Offsite Awards Project of the Year and Winner of Winners over the past decade.

Our presentation would outline the industry and government drivers behind the requirement for MMC in healthcare and other sectors, how we have integrated MMC delivery with our BSI BIM Level 2 Kitemark accredited Digital Delivery processes, and how this links with other requirements such as reducing embodied carbon. We would provide real life examples from the healthcare sector, and learning from these for discussion with our peers in the audience and to stimulate a debate within the conference.

We have presented over recent years at Education Estates, AUDE, and other significant conferences, and would be delighted to bring this learning to IHEEM 2022.

SPEAKER

3:00 pm - 3:20 pm

NHP – “The Biggest Hospital Building Programme in a Generation”

The unique circumstances surrounding the completion of the new Royal Hospital makes this scheme an exemplar project for lesson learned.
In 2018, when close to completion, the initial PFI contractor Carillion entered administration, leaving the NHS and Trust with a significant financial challenge and complex structural, building fabric and various other defect related issues.
Extensive works have followed to rectify major problems including extensive remediation to the structure and removal of significant sections of the building envelope and fabric.
The Royal Liverpool Hospital will reach Practical Completion and hospital commissioning will be completed by the week of IHEEM and as such will be the first major hospital completed under HIP cohort 1.
Paul, supported by the delivery team will highlight on the challenges encountered and how the building has finally become ready to accept patients and staff despite the turbulent delivery journey

Turner & Townsend will elaborate on the strategic approach to NHP as an introduction to Paul's presentation

Chairman

SPEAKER

  • Paul Fitzpatrick Director of Estates & Facilites - Liverpool Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
3:45 pm - 4:15 pm

Coffee & Exhibition Visit

4:15 pm - 4:35 pm

Using Innovative Technologies to Make the NHS Estate More Flexible: NHS Open Space

Technology and the estate are both vital to delivering the NHS Long-Term Plan, and combining the two with an innovative piece of PropTech will help to answer the changing requirements and usage of NHS buildings. Health and wellbeing services are seeking more flexible access to spaces that are closer to communities, and often have to spend time and resources on finding and securing sessional space across a range of Primary Care Buildings.

In our presentation, NHS Property Services (NHSPS) would like to present our latest innovative solution to help solve this problem. NHS Open Space, developed by NHSPS, brings technology to the NHS estate by offering a digital platform and onsite support for the flexible booking of sessional space. The service supports health and wellbeing providers looking for alternative and flexible ways to deliver services in their community by using pay-as-you-go NHS spaces nationwide. These rooms can be booked by the hour, session, or day and cover both clinical and non-clinical spaces ranging from examination rooms, to offices, to group activity rooms. This programme is a significant step forward in the optimisation of the NHS estate, making much more efficient use of the estate and minimising vacant or underused space. It opens Primary Care buildings up to a wider range of health and wellbeing services, bringing care closer to the heart of local communities so we can reduce pressure on larger hospitals and make life easier for patients.

In this presentation we would like to explore NHS Open Space's journey, from identifying the role of property data and technology in supporting everchanging requirements for NHS space, to building a nationwide solution to help transform the NHS estate that we hope to further expand throughout 2022.

SPEAKER

  • Chris King Principal Strategic Asset Manager - NHSPS
4:35 pm - 4:55 pm

Developing an integrated infrastructure strategy: lessons learned from the BaNES Swindon and Wiltshire ICS

The BaNES Swindon and Wiltshire (BSW) ICS has a strong track record of effective estate strategy development and implementation, which has underpinned a programme of improvements to our hospital, community health and primary care facilities over the past few years. Further, publicly-funded, capital schemes are under development. We have been on a journey from individual organisations developing plans to meet their estates needs to a more collective approach. However, as has been the case for many ICSs, we recognised that we had some way to go before we had a fully integrated system-wide approach to strategic estates planning, and we changed our approach accordingly.

Delivering high-quality patient care requires an integrated approach to infrastructure, incorporating buildings, equipment, plant and digital technology into a single, coherent, environmentally sustainable strategy. New ways of working create the need to go beyond just thinking about facilities to considering buildings, equipment and digital technology as a combined asset.

Our transition from a silo approach to healthcare service delivery to integrated system-wide approaches, reflected in our new Health and Care Model, drives a need for new ways of thinking and for infrastructure to be seen as a collective asset rather than an organisation's own property.

All forms of healthcare infrastructure need to be planned (and funded) on a system basis, e.g., the concept of the 'smart hospital' needs to be extended to all healthcare facilities within our system.

Environmental sustainability targets and our Net Zero Carbon (NZC) commitments need a joined-up system-wide approach if they are to be achieved. NZC targets necessitate thinking differently about healthcare buildings and taking an infrastructure-based approach.

This presentation will describe the progress we have made (supported by Currie & Brown), the challenges we have faced and the opportunities we have identified through taking an integrated approach to infrastructure planning.

SPEAKER

  • Simon Yeo BSW Assistant Director of Estates - NHS Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group
4:55 pm - 5:15 pm

How Clinical Needs Have Shaped the Design and Delivery of a New Emergency Department

An all female team present four perspectives of delivering a significant new healthcare project from concept to completion; Walsall Manor Emergency Department for Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust.

Delivered under the Procure 22 Framework, four speakers from different disciplines will describe the collaborative journey of the project and how the new ED will support Walsall Manor by improving patient experience, streamlining patient pathways and providing flexibility for the future, as well as covering lessons learned.

Debbie White
Senior Project Manager for Emergency Department and Acute Care New Build
Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

Debbie will describe the background to the brief for a new ED, the requirements of the Trust, funding challenges and the aspirations for this new build to meet the growing demands on Walsall Manor Hospital.

Suzanne MacCormick
Director and Healthcare Planner
Spencer Harrison

Suzanne will demonstrate how a clinically-led approach, developed through workshops with multiple staff groups, ensured both a design wrapped around excellence in patient flow and a solution that improves the experience of patients and staff alike. She will illustrate how this clinically-driven design will help the Trust deliver operational efficiencies throughout its urgent and emergency care pathways.

Rebecca Phillips
Design Manager
Tilbury Douglas Construction

Becky will explain how the design and layout of the new Emergency Department has reflected the consultation process through the careful consideration of spatial design, key adjacencies and routes, design flexibility and a first-class healthcare environment. From a main contractor perspective she will discuss how Tilbury Douglas harnessed the Procure22 framework to overcome key challenges, including programme, budget and delivery on a fully operational hospital site.

Rachel Sutton
Mechanical Project Engineer
Tilbury Douglas Engineering

Rachel will divulge the innovations of the project and how the delivery team used technology and modern methods of construction to ensure high quality, value and reduce programme.

SPEAKERS

  • Suzanne McCormick Director and Healthcare Planner - Spencer Harrison
  • Rebecca Phillips Senior Design Manager - Tilbury Douglas Construction
  • Rachel Sutton Mechanical Project Engineer - Tilbury Douglas Engineering
  • View full profile for Debbie WhiteDebbie White Senior Project Manager for Emergency Department and Acute Care New Build - Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust